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Signs You Could Have a Heart Attack Next Month

Signs You Could Have a Heart Attack Next Month,These early heart attack symptoms in women can include: Pronounced fatigue Sleep disturbances Shortness of breath Indigestion Loss of appetite Difficulties thinking/remembering Anxiety Weak/heavy arms

Friday, March 8, 2019

/ by Myheartcares
Signs You Could Have a Heart Attack Next Month

Signs You Could Have a Heart Attack Next Month

Many people don’t know this, but heart attack symptoms in women can surface a month before a heart attack occurs: giving you time to ward off a cardiac event before it happens. These early heart attack symptoms in women can include:


  • Pronounced fatigue
  • Sleep disturbances
  • Shortness of breath
  • Indigestion
  • Loss of appetite
  • Difficulties thinking/remembering
  • Anxiety
  • Weak/heavy arms
It’s important to note that these heart attack symptoms in women can come and go, disappearing as mysteriously as they came on. So, if you have intermittent symptoms you should consider getting a full cardiovascular workup. This is not something you want to ignore.


Risk Factors for Heart Disease in Women

While women and men share many of the same risk factors for heart disease, there are also many importance differences. Knowing these differences can help you to protect yourself against having a cardiac event.

High Blood Pressure: Women and high blood pressure tend to go together. The reason is that women have smaller blood vessels. Plus, women are more likely than men to have diastolic dysfunction, making the deadly side effects of high blood pressure in women a much greater health risk.


Menopause: While men tend to have cardiovascular events about 10 years earlier than women, a woman’s risk is equal to (or greater than) a man’s once she reaches menopause. The reason is that during menopause, estrogen levels drop—and estrogen is what keeps your arteries flexible and strengthens your arterial walls. When your estrogen declines, your blood pressure is likely to rise. Plus, estrogen is associated with the production of “good” HDL cholesterol that protects against heart disease in women—therefore, as estrogen declines, so can HDL cholesterol.


Being 20% (Or More) Over Your Ideal Weight: Weight is a significant risk factor for heart disease in women and men, and losing even a few pounds can improve your heart health. That’s because shedding unwanted pounds helps to reduce your inflammation levels, lowers your blood pressure, reduces your risk of developing type 2 diabetes, and decreases your risk of having a heart attack or stroke.


Having a Waist Size of 36 Inches or More: Your waist size is important since it’s an indicator of how much belly fat you have. Unlike other forms of fat, belly fat is metabolically active—secreting chemicals that cause inflammation throughout your body. If you don’t get that inflammation under control, it can damage the blood vessels in your kidneys and damage your coronary arteries. For women, to prevent heart disease you want to keep your waist size at less than 36 inches.


High Triglycerides: While triglycerides are a risk factor for heart disease in both men and women, a high triglyceride level (above 200 mg/dL) is more problematic for women than men. If you’re a woman with diabetes and high triglycerides, you have an up to 200 times greater risk of developing heart disease.


Leading a Sedentary Lifestyle: Inactivity can raise your risk of developing high blood pressure and diabetes, both of which can contribute to heart disease in women. Since women and high blood pressure are so closely related, staying active is very important.

Diabetes: Heart disease and diabetes are closely related for both men and women, but women with diabetes are twice as likely to develop heart disease as men. Plus, women who have type 2 diabetes are more likely to have a heart attack at a younger age than men and have a greater likelihood of dying after a first heart attack than men.

Smoking: While smoking is hazardous to everyone’s health, it’s even more dangerous for women than it is for men. Women who smoke have a 25% higher risk of developing coronary artery disease than men. Even smoking just one cigarette a day can significantly raise your heart disease risk. So, if you smoke, you want to take steps to quit.


Stress: Research has shown that mental stress can affect women’s hearts very differently than it does men’s hearts. Women who have experienced mental stress are more likely than men to have myocardial ischemia (reduced blood flow to the heart). They are also more likely to have blood platelet aggregation (early blood clots).

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